Longtime Grand Ole Opry member Stonewall Jackson dies at 89

Longtime Grand Ole Opry member Stonewall Jackson dies at 89

Jackson was known for his classic country singles that charted on the Hot Country Songs chart,
including the country No 1s ‘Waterloo’ (1959) and ‘B.J. the D.J.’ (1963), as well as songs like ‘Life to Go’ (1958) and ‘Don’t Be Angry’ (1964).

Washington: Musician Stonewall Jackson, a Grand Ole Opry member who had a longtime career in country music, has died at the age of 89.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Jackson passed away on Saturday following a battle with vascular dementia, the Grand Ole Opry confirmed. Born in Tabor City, North Carolina, Jackson was then raised in Georgia before heading to Nashville. He was known for his classic country singles that charted on the Hot Country Songs chart, including the country No 1s ‘Waterloo’ (1959) and ‘B.J. the D.J.’ (1963), as well as songs like ‘Life to Go’ (1958) and ‘Don’t Be Angry’ (1964).

In an interview with a Magazine, Jackson recalled the excitement of being offered a five-year contract with the Grand Ole Opry on his first invitation to play there in 1956, after Wesley Rose heard his music and set him up with an audition.

Jackson became a member of the Opry without having a record deal at the time. He joined the Grand Ole Opry on November 3, 1956, longer ago than any other current member.

Jackson noted in the interview, “I’m not putting down the record end of the business because that’s very important, too. But to me, the way I came here and all, the Grand Ole Opry’s been the mainstay in my career. I still love the Grand Ole Opry very, very much.”

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“I intend to play it as long as I can still sing ‘Don’t Be Angry,'” Jackson said, referencing one of the first songs he ever performed at the Opry.

As per The Hollywood Reporter, a performance at the Grand Ole Opry Saturday night will be in dedication to Jackson. (ANI)

first published:Dec. 5, 2021, 11:16 p.m.

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